1. amoribus:

    I’m a cutie and by a cutie I mean desperate for attention

    (via amoribus)

  2. have you ever had sex on a plane?

    we-should-fuck-now-that-i:

    Not yet… but I will join the mile high club sooner or later ;) lol

  3. live-as-a-teen:

    dogepom:

    patickstump:

    if you shame girls about their breast size i will push you into traffic

    "Who’s flat now?"

    whos flat now

    (Source: patickstump, via vivid-melodies)

    (Source: scarredprince, via sagihairius)

  4. (Source: shutyourname, via sayhiiighnikki)

  5. Exclusive: Lana Del Rey waving at House Festival, 2012

    (via lohanthony)

  6. "

    A thought experiment: Imagine how people might react if Taylor Swift released an album made up entirely of songs about wishing she could get back together with one of her exes.

    We’d hear things like: “She can’t let go. She’s clingy. She’s irrational. She’s crazy.” Men would have a field day comparing her to their own “crazy” exes.

    Yet when Robin Thicke released “Paula” – a plea for reconciliation with his ex-wife Paula Patton disguised as an LP — he was called incoherent, obsessed, heartfelt and, in particular, creepy.

    But you didn’t hear men calling him “crazy” — even though he used it as the title of one of tracks.

    No, “crazy” is typically held in reserve for women’s behavior. Men might be obsessed, driven, confused or upset. But we don’t get called “crazy” — at least not the way men reflexively label women as such.

    “Crazy” is one of the five deadly words guys use to shame women into compliance. The others: Fat. Ugly. Slutty. Bitchy. They sum up the supposedly worst things a woman can be.

    WHAT WE REALLY MEAN BY “CRAZY” IS: “SHE WAS UPSET, AND I DIDN’T WANT HER TO BE.”

    “Crazy” is such a convenient word for men, perpetuating our sense of superiority. Men are logical; women are emotional. Emotion is the antithesis of logic. When women are too emotional, we say they are being irrational. Crazy. Wrong.

    Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.

    Small wonder that abusers love to use this c-word. It’s a way of delegitimizing a woman’s authority over her own life.

    Most men (#notallmen, #irony) aren’t abusers, but far too many of us reflexively call women crazy without thinking about it. We talk about how “crazy girl sex” is the best sex while we also warn men “don’t stick it in the crazy.” How I Met Your Mother warned us to watch out for “the crazy eyes” and how to process women on the “Crazy/Hot” scale. When we talk about why we broke up with our exes, we say, “She got crazy,” and our guy friends nod sagely, as if that explains everything.


    Except what we’re really saying is: “She was upset, and I didn’t want her to be.”

    Many men are socialized to be disconnected from our emotions — the only manly feelings we’re supposed to show are stoic silence or anger. We’re taught that to be emotional is to be feminine. As a result, we barely have a handle on our own emotions — meaning that we’re especially ill-equipped at dealing with someone else’s.

    That’s where “crazy” comes in. It’s the all-purpose argument ender. Your girlfriend is upset that you didn’t call when you were going to be late? She’s being irrational. She wants you to spend time with her instead of out with the guys again? She’s being clingy. Your wife doesn’t like the long hours you’re spending with your attractive co-worker? She’s being oversensitive.

    As soon as the “crazy” card is in play, women are put on the defensive. It derails the discussion from what she’s saying to how she’s saying it. We insist that someone can’t be emotional and rational at the same time, so she has to prove that she’s not being irrational. Anything she says to the contrary can just be used as evidence against her.

    More often than not, I suspect, most men don’t realize what we’re saying when we call a woman crazy. Not only does it stigmatize people who have legitimate mental health issues, but it tells women that they don’t understand their own emotions, that their very real concerns and issues are secondary to men’s comfort. And it absolves men from having to take responsibility for how we make others feel.

    In the professional world, we’ve had debates over labels like “bossy” and “brusque,” so often used to describe women, not men. In our interpersonal relationships and conversations, “crazy” is the adjective that needs to go.

    "

    Men really need to stop calling women crazy - Harris O’Malley (via hello-lilianab)

    (Source: Washington Post, via wolfkaylee)

  7. julieidk:

    if someone tells you that you are not good enough, do not listen to them because you are 100% good enough

    (via ruinedchildhood)

  8. im so fucking sorry


    elasticitymudflap:

    nyehs:

    realjunko:

    i fORGOT MY LAPTOP WAS HOOKED UP TO THE STEREO SYSTEM SO THIS JUST PLAYED IN EVERY ROOM OF MY HOUSE OH MY GOD

    [TO THE TUNE OF “PON PON PON - Kyary Pamyu Pamyu”] (Music fades in) Tabun sonnan ja dame desho Oh yea Mr Krabs oh yea oh yea Mr Krabs oh yea Mr Krabs oh yea oh yea Mr Krabs oh yea Mr Krabs oh yea oh yea Mr Krabs oh yea Mr Krabs oh yea oh yea Mr Krabs Krab Krab AHH AHH AHH Krab Krab AHH Krab AHH Krab Krab Krab Krab AHH AHH AHH Krab Krab AHH Krab AHH Krab Krab Krab Krab AHH AHH AHH Krab Krab AHH Krab AHH Krab Krab Oh yea Mr Krabs (Music slowly fades out)

    WHY DOES  T HIS PIECE OF SHIT HAVE 99K FUCKING NOTES NOT A DAY GOES BY I DONT REGRET MAKING THIS POST I HATE ALL OF YOU AND IM NUKING MY COMPUTER FROM ORBIT

    (via the-average-gatsby)

  9. 0verzealous:

    Thanksgiving with the family

    (Source: tehunicornjesus, via linalinalinaa)

  10. pixelgardens:

    ぱんだ | m@かにかま下さい [pixiv]

    (via theunicornkittenkween)

  11. do-you-love-me-surfer-girl:

    petition for all dogs and rock stars to be immortal thank u

    (Source: queef-richards, via specialmay)

    becauseiamawoman:

    Feminist Art Friday Feature: Phoebe Wahl

    This Feminist Art Friday we are taking a bit of a different approach to one of our favorite posts and featuring a contemporary artist you can actually connect with here on Tumblr. You may have seen her work floating around and widely reblogged across the site (including on this blog) and it is impossible not to fall in love with her whimsical folk-ey art. 

    Phoebe Wahl, a recent graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design where she received a BFA in Illustration, now lives in the Pacific Northwest. She is also a contributor at Taproot Magazine where she recently illustrated their 2014 calendar.

    We were lucky enough to get in touch with Phoebe about her art and feminism, and here is what she had to say:

    Showing my work to the world, for me is like putting my diary on display. The images I create are deeply tied to my own experiences, and dreams for my future. I make art about body positivity because it’s what I personally need to hear. My “Practice Radical Self Love” piece was something I painted in my journal, originally. A mantra to repeat to myself. When I posted it on my blog and shared it with the world it was a pivotal moment, the moment where I decided to make a statement I wasn’t entirely sure I could stand behind. Because self-love so radical is hard work. A task that feels impossible. But trying is what we can strive for, and working to be gentle and compassionate with ourselves and others on our lifelong journeys of self-loving. 

    Our culture promotes body-shaming so viciously, that I think it’s important to begin to speak up and relate to one another about that shame so many of us have in common. The shame that is spoon-fed to us from such a tender age. 

    I myself hold onto the fear that it is somehow weak and anti-feminist to admit I want to change my body. I am afraid that wanting to lose weight makes me a tool to our misogynistic weight-obsessed culture. But simultaneously I invest just as heavily in the fear that if I don’t lose weight, I am not beautiful and desirable. There is no right and wrong way to be a woman, I think too often feminism is pigeon-holed as just one way of looking and acting. It is believing in equality, and being active and intentional in your own life choices. It is standing up for your self worth. People have told me that because much of my work portrays women in nurturing roles as mothers and lovers, or cooking in aprons and dresses it is anti-feminist and heteronormative. I reject this.  

    To say that domesticity is synonymous with submission is to dishonor the thousands of years worth of strong and independent women who have acted as homemakers, and the men and women who continue to passionately fill this role of their own volition. 

    To me there is nothing more sexist and anti-feminist than someone saying there is only one right way to be as a woman. As my mother often tells me “There are more ANDs than ORs in life”. I will wear a dress and makeup AND have hairy armpits. I will help support my family through my career AND be a nurturing, present parent. I will work to lose weight for my own comfort AND I will strive to love myself just as I am. I will sleep with whomever I chose AND reserve the right to say no.  

    I think it is time we as feminists say no to the cycles of shame and fear we allow ourselves to be tangled in, and stand up to support all people in making empowered and intentional choices rooted in love. 

    If you’re interested in learning more about Phoebe Wahl and her art, try the following resources:

    (via linalinalinaa)

  12. macklemack:

    how old is ariana grande? 13? 27?

    (via linalinalinaa)



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